Protecting Data From External Attacks

Stop and read this before you make a mistake


Wannacry, Jaff, Cryptolocker, and many many more belong to a category of hacking tools called ransomware. This software works by infiltrating your system via a infected Word document, an image using steganography, a corrupt media file, or a host of other ways.

This works by using encryption algorithms that encrypts all of the data in your hard drive. More over, it also can encrypt data on ANY drive that you may be connected to. This includes USB thumb drives, attached hard drives (whether via USB or network connection), and any cloud connected drives such as Box, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or any other similar service.

So how do you protect yourself? Technology professionals know to use tools like Ghost, EaseUS, Acronis, or backup software like Crashplan, Carbonite, or even Backblaze can be used to take the data off of your hardware and place it on to either a local hard drive or some cloud based host.

Your data is protected with these tools because the imaging and cloning tools, essentially take a real time picture of your hard drive, store on the connected storage device that you then disconnect when the process has finished.

Yes these tools take a significant amount of time to run based on your drive size. Since many people have 1 terabyte or larger drive in their desktop, all-in-one, or laptop, you can start this process before going to bed at night. First make sure that you have setup your system not to go to sleep during the imaging process. Then follow the directions provided with the product you are using. Some products are free to use for personal use while others may run into hundreds of dollars but provide online data storage with its plan.

Before you disconnect the attached or networked drive, take the time to test your image/backup to insure it is holding data in a valid form. Once you have done this, you should make a hash of the data and I will cover that in a later piece. It is imperative for your data’s safety and your own sanity that the data you have stored on the drive is perfect. Any number of things can cause this data to become corrupt.

This is why I always suggest making a copy of your image and storing it someplace away from the location of the machine. What were to happen if your laptop and backup drive were stolen from your home? You would lose the original data plus the backup that you have just created. If your data is stored at some other location, they may get the laptop but you can replace that and then restore from your image, backup.

This goes for those of you with Windows systems, Mac systems, and even Linux systems.

This will be continued later this week….