Protecting Data From External Attacks

Stop and read this before you make a mistake


Wannacry, Jaff, Cryptolocker, and many many more belong to a category of hacking tools called ransomware. This software works by infiltrating your system via a infected Word document, an image using steganography, a corrupt media file, or a host of other ways.

This works by using encryption algorithms that encrypts all of the data in your hard drive. More over, it also can encrypt data on ANY drive that you may be connected to. This includes USB thumb drives, attached hard drives (whether via USB or network connection), and any cloud connected drives such as Box, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or any other similar service.

So how do you protect yourself? Technology professionals know to use tools like Ghost, EaseUS, Acronis, or backup software like Crashplan, Carbonite, or even Backblaze can be used to take the data off of your hardware and place it on to either a local hard drive or some cloud based host.

Your data is protected with these tools because the imaging and cloning tools, essentially take a real time picture of your hard drive, store on the connected storage device that you then disconnect when the process has finished.

Yes these tools take a significant amount of time to run based on your drive size. Since many people have 1 terabyte or larger drive in their desktop, all-in-one, or laptop, you can start this process before going to bed at night. First make sure that you have setup your system not to go to sleep during the imaging process. Then follow the directions provided with the product you are using. Some products are free to use for personal use while others may run into hundreds of dollars but provide online data storage with its plan.

Before you disconnect the attached or networked drive, take the time to test your image/backup to insure it is holding data in a valid form. Once you have done this, you should make a hash of the data and I will cover that in a later piece. It is imperative for your data’s safety and your own sanity that the data you have stored on the drive is perfect. Any number of things can cause this data to become corrupt.

This is why I always suggest making a copy of your image and storing it someplace away from the location of the machine. What were to happen if your laptop and backup drive were stolen from your home? You would lose the original data plus the backup that you have just created. If your data is stored at some other location, they may get the laptop but you can replace that and then restore from your image, backup.

This goes for those of you with Windows systems, Mac systems, and even Linux systems.

This will be continued later this week….

WIndows Tips from the command line

A screen grab of Superfish intercepting an interaction with Bank of America (PHOTO COURTESY OF PCMagazine).

The first of several Windows tips

Starting today I am going to help you with a set of simple commands that can bail you out in the event your computer has some problem.

Windows tip #1–many of you have never used the command line interface or even know what it does. Windows has a large set of programs that run in command line mode but you do not have an icon to any of them.

One of these programs is called taskkill.exe — C:\Windows32\System32taskkill.exe

This program is very powerful and can save you if some program gets stuck.

In order to use it, you will need to know the proper name of the program running … i.e.: Internet Explorer’s executable file is iexplore.exe — in order to find the names, open up the command line tool and run it as Administrator.

There are two ways to do this:

1) Hold down the Windows key while pressing the “R” key
2) Click on the Start button (if you have it)

Either way you get the Run line to come up, type in “cmd admin” and press enter. A box that resembles an old school black and white computer screen pops up.

The first command you should know is C:\Windows\System32\tasklist.exe — this opens up a list of all running programs and gives you their name, the name of the program, the process identification number, and whether it is a service (meaning that it starts up when you boot up your computer) or if it is a console (meaning it runs when you ask it to) program.

Your screen should like this:

A printoout of the C:\Windows\System32\tasklist.exe command

Windows command line tasklist.exe

Find the AppleUpdateService.exe program. It has a process identification number of 1872. This is an example of a program that is harmless to terminate/kill.

With the commandline console still opened type in ‘C:\Windows\System32\taskkill.exe \f \im AdobeUpdateService.exe’ — now you should know that the \F means “FORCE” and the \IM means image name. There is a bunch of these and you can find them explained on DOSPrompt.com.

This will immediately terminate the program and it will react as if you have just unplugged the system. It will immediately stop and not allow any process it may be controlling to complete. Where the taskkill.exe command is most useful is in terminating browsers should one indicate a site that will not let you leave it unless you click on a box asking you to perform some task.

There is a reason why you will want to stop that browser immediately but we will go into that later.

You can also use the ‘C:\Windows\System32\taskkill.exe \f \PID 1872’ and it will terminate the same program. Only now, instead of using the programs name, you are using its process identification number.

This is the first of a series of tips on using the commandline in Windows. If you have questions, comments, something to add, or think this is stupid…please let me know.

For a list of commands that run in Windows command line, you can go to Microsoft’s Technet Site. You should also feel free to perform your own searches to find a list of commands that are explained in a way that makes better sense to you. Technet is a Microsoft product but it is not really meant to be used by the home user.

Time to talk Windows 10

No Windows 10 icon from BetaNews.com

No Windows 10 icon from BetaNews.com

Julie Andrews famous song from the Sound of Music starts with “Let’s start at the very beginning. A very good place to start” and this is where I am at…starting at the very beginning.

Microsoft is touting all the greatness of Windows 10. They say it is more secure and it is more useful than previous versions but in reality, Windows 10 is nothing more than Windows Vista. Technically it is Windows version 6.4 and Vista is 6.1. That tells you that they put lipstick and mascara on a pig and called it your date to the prom. Whether or not you accept it as a date is entirely up to you.

And this is why I write this…to help you make an educated decision about either upgrading to Windows 10 or if you are already there with Win10, I can help you lock it down to limit Microsoft (and it’s partner’s) ability to spy on you.

Two things to remember while you go through this…one–Microsoft is in business to make money and not to provide you with the best or even a workable operating system. Two–you cannot trust everything you read, hear, or are handed by a for-profit company.

No–this is not paranoia but truth. Each publicly traded company’s first responsibility is to its investors…not to its customers or its employees.

So with that stated…I will start walking down the Windows 10 road during this next week. It’s my way of saying thank you for reading this.