Images You Must See From a More Than Interested Participant

Cpl. Reynaldo Leal after patrol

Cpl. Reynaldo Leal after patrol


No war is complete without the use of images to show us at home how our loved ones, friends, fellow Americans, are doing and handling themselves overseas.

Today, CNN’s main page has a photo piece done by Corporal Reynaldo Leal which is an excellent piece. It is just him talking about his photographic work. The CNN article is a must-see and his photo gallery is also a must see as well. Here are the links to both:

Corporal Leal’s Images on AfterImage
Cpl. Reynaldo Leal story on CNN

More about online photo storage

Well I told you a couple of months ago that I would give you some additional information regarding online photo storage and there has been a little movement in the market as prices have come down a little bit and services have become easier to use and access. So let’s review my top five online digital photography storage sites.

First let’s review my criteria for selecting someplace to store your images online:

  1. Provides you with tools to upload multiple images off of your PC/Camera at one time
  2. Provides you with access to your images regardless of platform (PC/Phone/etc)
  3. Provides you with quality service around the clock
  4. Provides you the ability to have backups of your image collection
  5. The service does not automatically resize your images or provides you with tools to restore their original size
  6. The service gives you control over who looks at and downloads your images

With that in mind, here are my top 7 online image hosting services. These are in no particular order. I do this because I want you to go to each site and maybe look up one or two of your own and see which ones you will think can work best for your needs.

  1. Adobe Photoshop.com starts you with 2GB of storage for free but that’s not this site’s strength. Oh no…this site’s strength is in its editting
    tools. These tools allow you to make basic image edits like remove red eye, crop the image, or make some basic changes. For $20/year, you
    can buy 20GB of space. And you can expect to pay $1/GB for each increase above that.
  2. Flickr’s free account provides you with a monthly upload/download limit which has changed and continues to change. For $25/year you get
    unlimited photo and video storage.
  3. Smugmug is service geared at semi-professional and professional photographers. For $40/$60/$150 a year you can have more control over the
    site that presents your images. All plans have unlimited storage and allow you universal access to your images. The high end plan gives you
    complete control over the page that displays your images plus the way you sell your photographs.
  4. Photobucket is an Internet staple. Free accounts get 500 MB of online storage and you are allowed up to 10GB of downloadable bandwidth per
    month. There is a 1MB size limit per photo so if you use a Canon Mark V with the 77MB raw files, this is not going to be the solution for
    you. However for $25 a year, those limitations are removed and you get to post images up to 4000×3000 plus access to their technical support
    team
  5. Webshots by American Greetings, is a service that comes with the ability to use your images or the predefined images of other photographers
    into your projects. What this means is that there is also a likelihood for others to have access to your images for things like calendars, coffee
    mugs, and the like. They give you a 1000 image limit and then boost that with 100 extra images for every month that you remain a member of
    their free plan. For $20/year, those restrictions are limited but this offering is among the least favorable ones for photographers looking to post
    the thousands of images they generate a year.

Now there are some prominent sites that I left out. I left them out for a reason. Either I am not a fan of their policies or I do not like the software they ask the user to use for their site. However everyone is different and I urge you to research these other sites as well.

If you have any additional questions, just ask.

A Digital Photography Memory Card Primer

SD, SDHC, Compact Flash, Memory Stick, miniSD, microSD, and about two dozen more anachronyms clutter the storage type definitions for your digital camera. Here’s a word or two about which you may need and why bigger is not always better.

Flash memory uses small chips to electronically store data and your camera may use any of a number of formats to store that data. You can look at your owner’s manual (I know..I know but honestly it is in there). Or you can refer to any number of online buying guides which will tell you which memory card would be the best one for your camera.

If you have a DSLR, the kind with an interchangeable lens and it’s kind of big, you probably use either a SD, SDHC, or Compact Flash card.

Now the SD and SDHC cards are almost identical but there is a difference. SD stands for Secure Digital format and it is an older technology. It has a maximum storage capacity 4 gigabytes. There are numerous manufacturers of these types of cards and each one ships formatted in a Fat32 format. If that format sounds familiar, it’s because that is the same format that was used by Windows.

SDHC is just like the SD memory cards except SDHC means Secure Digital High Capacity. These cards start at the 4GB mark and are currently available in 32GB versions.

And some companies already are coming out with the next generation of secure digital cards with capacities that can get up to 2TB.

SD cards come in different speeds, Class 2, Class 4, and Class 6.. The difference in these speeds has a direct correlation on how fast they read and write data to the memory card from your device. The fast the read/write time, the quicker your camera can unload data from its internal memory and on to the card which frees up memory for the next shot. This can lead to a faster burst of speed if you are taking photos are a very fast pace.

The same is true for Compact Flash. Compace Flash cards come in Class I, Class II, and Class III. Class III cards are the newest and fastest. Class I cards are the oldest technology and Class II is the happy medium.

The current maximum capacity for a Class III compact flash card is 64GB. These Class III cards write at 90mb/s or Class 6 speeds on an SDHC card.

These large cards are great for video. So if you have a DSLR that is capable of video, these large and fast cards are for you. However, if you have a DSLR or even a point and shoot camera, smaller is better.

Why? The answer is simple. The larger the capacity of the card the more data you are able to store on it. The more data that you store on it and this means that there is a larger risk of losing more images or data that is stored on it. So smaller is better because if a small card gets corrupted and you lose data, the fewer images or the less important data that you lose.

These same rules hold true for other memory formats. Use smaller cards, switch them out and you run less of a risk.

There is one more thing to know about digital memory cards. On each card, there is usually a switch that locks the card and prevent someone from accidentally erasing the data on it before you have had a chance to download it on to a larger capacity device, like your computer or your photo sharing service.

Just an idea….

Camera Classes

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So from time to time it may be a good idea to take a class, either online or in-person to remember how this whole capture of light thing works. A few notes from the class I took over the weekend for those of you with new DSLR cameras.

1) Auto format–good if you really don’t know what you’re doing. But it’s like walking up to a baker and saying “make me a cake” and you get a strawberry banana cake when you wanted German chocolate. You didn’t specify what kind of cake and the same holds true for taking photographs.

2) ISO–you cannot overstate the importance of having the proper ISO for your conditions. If you are outside on a bright sunny day, ISO 200 or even 400 will work for you but at twilight, time to open that thing up higher and start approaching the 1600 range as lighting degrades. Experiment with different ISO settings to see how this works. It’s a DSLR and the space on a memory card is cheap. Blowing that once in a lifetime shot may not be so expendable.

3) Aperture (f-stop) — this is how big the hole is in the lens that lets light through. The bigger the hole, the more light shines through. It’s sorta like the family idiot…everyone knows he’s got a big enough hole in his head that you can see clean down to his gullet but he just won’t quit showing it off. Same is true here. The lower the number, the larger the opening. If you can find a lens with a 2.8, 1.8, 1.4 or so aperture then you can grab some really intense photos in low light. Conversely, if you have a smaller aperture lens, say a f4-6.3, you have what is called a slow lens. It’s slow because it requires more time for the shutter to remain open in lower lighting to achieve a decent image. That also means that your image is more prone to blurry shots because nothing really stands still long enough anymore. Well except for the oldest brother in my family…he sits still for so long, Mom had to dust him as a child…oh wait…that was me.

4) and finally…Shutter speed. This is how fast the shutter opens and closes to control how much light passes through the lens and into the sensor. It also determines how your image will be captured. A fast shutter speed means that you will stop motion faster but it also means that your aperture must be opened more in order for enough light to pass through to get a good enough image to use.  If you look at the photo above, you can see where I stopped the helicopters rotors in flight. It’s a neat trick but I must confess…the camera was on auto…and what was that about strawberry banana cake again.

Questions? Let me know…you can look online for digital photography classes in your community. Check with your local community college for continuing education classes as well as check with local camera shops. That’s where I took mine…and it only cost me $30 for two and a half hours of refreshing my brain. I wish I could do that for math. But if you are in the San Antonio area, check the Camera Exchange website and let them know you read about it here on Jchampion.com.

They aren’t paying me anything but I figure if I get enough referrals they might let me take the next class for free.