Protecting Data From External Attacks

Stop and read this before you make a mistake


Wannacry, Jaff, Cryptolocker, and many many more belong to a category of hacking tools called ransomware. This software works by infiltrating your system via a infected Word document, an image using steganography, a corrupt media file, or a host of other ways.

This works by using encryption algorithms that encrypts all of the data in your hard drive. More over, it also can encrypt data on ANY drive that you may be connected to. This includes USB thumb drives, attached hard drives (whether via USB or network connection), and any cloud connected drives such as Box, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, or any other similar service.

So how do you protect yourself? Technology professionals know to use tools like Ghost, EaseUS, Acronis, or backup software like Crashplan, Carbonite, or even Backblaze can be used to take the data off of your hardware and place it on to either a local hard drive or some cloud based host.

Your data is protected with these tools because the imaging and cloning tools, essentially take a real time picture of your hard drive, store on the connected storage device that you then disconnect when the process has finished.

Yes these tools take a significant amount of time to run based on your drive size. Since many people have 1 terabyte or larger drive in their desktop, all-in-one, or laptop, you can start this process before going to bed at night. First make sure that you have setup your system not to go to sleep during the imaging process. Then follow the directions provided with the product you are using. Some products are free to use for personal use while others may run into hundreds of dollars but provide online data storage with its plan.

Before you disconnect the attached or networked drive, take the time to test your image/backup to insure it is holding data in a valid form. Once you have done this, you should make a hash of the data and I will cover that in a later piece. It is imperative for your data’s safety and your own sanity that the data you have stored on the drive is perfect. Any number of things can cause this data to become corrupt.

This is why I always suggest making a copy of your image and storing it someplace away from the location of the machine. What were to happen if your laptop and backup drive were stolen from your home? You would lose the original data plus the backup that you have just created. If your data is stored at some other location, they may get the laptop but you can replace that and then restore from your image, backup.

This goes for those of you with Windows systems, Mac systems, and even Linux systems.

This will be continued later this week….

Nikon’s newest big toy

Okay…so I have sent off to Nikon asking them to test drive their new D300S DSLR camera. This thing is a huge step up over my current D40. For starters the new D300S takes up to 8 pictures per second and it gives the user more control over the camera than my D40 does.

It shoots with 12.3 megapixels of clarity in your images plus it also offers 51 autofocus points which is substantially more than my D40.

The camera is a professional grade camera. It has a remarkable movie feature but my understanding has been that it can only shoot about 5 minutes worth of moving video. That’s apparently the most a 4GB memory card can hold but surprise! This model features both a compact flash and an SD card slot.

In actuality, Nikon unveiled several DSLR’s as well as a number of new cameras in its Coolpix line of cameras. I have one of the lower end Coolpix models and it takes very good photos and it is a great point and shoot camera.

I don’t expect Nikon to say yes but it’s worth a shot.

When is enough access for electronics companies?

It started with Netscape 2. You would visit a site and in order to remember your settings and other information that would be annoying to reenter over and over again, so the web site would place a cookie on your computer which stored all the details of your previous visit(s).

Then came tracking beacons and phone home applications that were placed on your computers. Now we have the case of Amazon’s reading device, the Kindle, which not only tracks your reading habits; it’s not happy enough with that ability. Now Amazon has the ability to remove content it does not think you should have.

Today, MSNBC has a story about a 17 year old advanced placement class student who lost all of his work and his copy of George Orwell’s 1984 when Amazon discovered that it had been selling an illegal (pirated) version of 1984. While it is not the teen’s fault that Amazon was lazy in checking the authority of the person offering the electronic copies of the novel for sale, it is also not up to Amazon to simply turn on its tracking devices and wipe the book off of you e-reader.

What bothers me is the level of control companies have over our lives. OnStar can turn off your car while you’re driving it. Microsoft has the ability to turn off your PC while you are using it. Music “rental”..ahem subscription sites, remove your ability to play music that you have paid them for. Other sites, like Yahoo music, go out of business and then turn off their authentication servers which prevent you from playing back material that you have paid for and thought you had every right to listen to.

The truth is, since Microsoft came up with the idea of licensing, your ability to enjoy media in a format that you have paid for has been significantly diminished. Media companies have retained more control than ever over your movies, music, and reading material. If you want to break this trend, you’re going to have to sacrifice.

Quit buying entertainment. Quit going to the movies. Quit wasting your money supporting businesses just because you might like what they have to offer. When you make a purchase you are supporting their bad policies that make honest people into criminals.

Picking the right lens for your Nikon DSLR

So if you have a Nikon D40, D40, D60, or similar low end DSLR camera, you will inevitably face the same problem I had finding a lens that will work with it. Sure…you can spend extra and get the Nikkor DX lenses which work great but had a substantially higher price tag. But I am including a list of lenses you can pick up that won’t break the bank and that will help you get that perfect shot.

Any of the Tamron Di-II lenses will work as they have the motor built into them. My experience with this manufacturer is limited to one lens, the 70-300mm f-4.0-6.3 Di-II. It takes great photos and has a built-in macro feature which allows you to get up close and person on some pretty small and detailed objects. I have mostly good things to say about this lens however, its biggest downside has to be its focuser. It is slow and often comes up soft. I frequently find myself kicking the lens out of Autofocus and putting it in manual mode.

Sigma makes a series as well called the DC line. Those are DSLR lenses which are compatible with the Nikon D40’s autofocusing system. While I have not used these, I have read and heard good things about this brand.

In case you don’t know, the thing that makes these lower end digital single lens reflex cameras different (DSLR cameras) is that the motor that drives the autofocuser is not in the body of the camera like it is on the higher end cameras. No…the autofocusing motor for these lies within the lens itself. There is a small opening on the lens mount in front of the camera that allows you to see the drive mechanism that feeds information back to the image processor inside the camera.

Nikon’s Nikkor lenses have a faster response time and focus better in the autofocus mode however…it is my experience that you lose little if you take the time and get used to your Tamron or Sigma lens and allow time for the focuser to kick in. If you are shooting sports or other lightning fast events, you may want to opt to pay a little bit more.

If you are looking to spend aroun $500 on your next lens, allow me to introduce you to the all in one wonder…the Tamron 18-270mm lens. This lens have an incredible amount of coverage and works well with your D40/D40x/D60/ etc….

Here is a series of images that I have taken with my Tamron lens:

alamoflowers-1 jackrabbits-12 DSC_0070

 

 

 

Here are lists from the major manufacturers of the lenses that may work with the Nikon lower end DSLR:

Nikon: http://imaging.nikon.com/products/imaging/lineup/lens/af/dx/index.htm

Sigma: http://www.sigmaphoto.com/lenses/lenses_all.asp

Tamron: http://www.tamron.com/lenses/default-photo.asp